Last edited by Gosho
Sunday, August 2, 2020 | History

2 edition of Religion in the USSR found in the catalog.

Religion in the USSR

Religion in the USSR

the truth and falsehood.

  • 107 Want to read
  • 1 Currently reading

Published by "Social Sciences Today" Editorial Board in Moscow .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Soviet Union,
  • Soviet Union.
    • Subjects:
    • Church and state -- Soviet Union.,
    • Soviet Union -- Religion.

    • Edition Notes

      Title in colophon: Religii͡a︡ v SSSR.

      SeriesReligious studies in the USSR ;, ser., 1
      ContributionsIzdatelʹstvo "Nauka." Redakt͡s︡ii͡a︡ "Obshchestvennye nauki i sovremennostʹ."
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsBL940.S65 R45 1986
      The Physical Object
      Pagination173 p. ;
      Number of Pages173
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL2435242M
      LC Control Number87126277

        Religion had been outlawed in the USSR and for some reason it was decided that religion could combat communism. The government voted to add religion to government. Money was redesigned and “One Nation Under God” was added first to coins and then bills. Read the full-text online edition of Religion in Soviet Russia: (). Home» Browse» Books» Book details, Religion in Soviet Russia:

        Religion is a sort of spiritual booze, in which the slaves of capital drown their human image [obraz], their demand for a life more or less worthy of man (Lenin ). This text is a direct allusion to Marx: “Religious suffering is, at one and the same time, the expression of real suffering and a protest against real suffering. Religion is. Religious Books for Russia. RBR was founded in to provide religious books for Orthodox Christians in the Soviet Union. Since it is now possible to publish and distribute religious literature in Russia, RBR assists with the publication in Russia of the best contemporary Orthodox theological and educational materials.

        The brutal rule of Iosif STALIN () strengthened communist rule and Russian dominance of the Soviet Union at a cost of tens of millions of lives. After defeating Germany in World War II as part of an alliance with the US (), the USSR expanded its territory and influence in Eastern Europe and emerged as a global power.   Religion in Communist Russia. As soon as the Communist era began in , the Soviet government made it its job to eradicate religion in the Soviet Union. Churches were demolished or turned into social clubs, the clergy was shot or sent to camps, and it became forbidden to teach religion to one's own children.


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Religion in the USSR Download PDF EPUB FB2

Marx said religion was the opium of the people – and in the Soviet Union, atheism became government policy, enforced by the state and encouraged by anti-religious. Making use of newly available archive material, this book provides the first systematic and accessible overview of church-state relations in the Soviet Union.

John Anderson explores the shaping of Soviet religious policy from the death of Stalin until the collapse of communism, and considers the place of religion in the post-Soviet by: Religion in the USSR book.

Read reviews from world’s largest community for readers. Religion in the USSR book. Read reviews from world’s largest community for readers.

George Robert Ackworth Conquest was a British historian who became a well known writer and researcher on the Soviet Union with the publication, inof his account of Pages: Genre/Form: Church history: Additional Physical Format: Online version: Institut zur Erforschung der UdSSR.

Religion in the USSR. Munich, (OCoLC) The Soviet government's Religion in the USSR book to religion in theory and practice is shown in this wide-ranging collection of annotated texts from the newly-opened archives. Included are documents from the KGB, the Central Committee, the Council for Religious Affairs and numerous other official bodies.

Christel Lane has written the first sociological study of religion in a communist and militantly atheist society. Christian Religion in the Soviet Union is the result of a detailed examination of Soviet sociological sources and the legally and illegally published reports of religious bodies or individuals, backed up by the observations of the author and of other Western visitors to the USSR.4/5(1).

An atheist journal changed its name to Science and Religion and became “the first Soviet periodical to give voice to religion,” according to Smolkin. Reading Smolkin’s book, I understood why she focused on Orthodox Christianity, by far the largest religious group in the Soviet Union.

This book brings together fifteen of the West's leading scholars of religion in the USSR. Bringing much hitherto unknown material to light, the authors discuss the policy apparatus, programmes of atheisation and socialisation, cults and sects, and the world of Christianity.

Christel Lane has written the first sociological study of religion in a communist and militantly atheist society. Christian Religion in the Soviet Union is the result of a detailed examination of Soviet sociological sources and the legally and illegally published reports of religious bodies or individuals, backed up by the observations of the author and of other Western vi3/5.

Religion became contested ground in the German Democratic Republic, with the governing Communists promoting state atheism, although some people remained loyal to Christian communities. At first the promotion of atheism received little official attention.

In the mids, as the Cold War heated up, atheism became a topic of major interest for the state, in both domestic and foreign contexts. Religion in the Soviet Union provides access to the archival materials, translated by the editor, in which bureaucrats debated policy, issued orders, and struggled with the problems religious believers caused the Soviet system.

Drawing on previously secret documents from the KGB, Central Committee, Council for Religious Affairs, and local Cited by: Religion in the USSR by Yaroslavsky, E. and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles available now at After the revolution, the Bolsheviks found themselves in control of all of Russia.

With political power in their hands, they expanded their ambitions to include restructuring the Russian. Additional Physical Format: Online version: Conquest, Robert. Religion in the USSR. London, Bodley Head, (OCoLC) Document Type: Book: All Authors.

The book discusses how religious organizations, especially the Russian Orthodox Church, operate in international relations, pursuing their own interests and those of the Russian state; explores how religious ideas and culture linked to religion impinge on Russian attitudes and identity, and thereby affect policy; and demonstrates how policy.

Religion () 13, THE STUDY OF RELIGION IN THE USSR James Thrower I A passionate and enduring interest in religious questions has been a feature of Russian intellectual life since the time of Tsar Nicholas I in the middle of the nineteenth century.

The postwar period is covered by Chumachenko, T. A., Church and State in Soviet Russia: Russian Orthodoxy from World War II to the Khrushchev Years (Armonk, NY: M. Sharpe, ), and Anderson, John, Religion, State and Politics in the Soviet Union and the Successor States (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, ).

Initially, there were just 30 anti-religious museums across the great expanse of the Soviet Union. But within four decades, there were hundreds of.

This book does not deal with theology. It is an attempt to provide a fuller understanding of Russian reality by drawing attention to what might be called 'the other Russia', the Russia of the believers.

I did not begin writing this book with any preconceived ideas about the strength of religion in the Soviet Union. Representatives from Ukraine, Russia, the unrecognized Russian proxy republics, and the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe also meet regularly to facilitate implementation of the peace deal.

More t civilians have been killed or wounded as a result of the Russian intervention in eastern Ukraine.

Russian law includes religious freedom protections such as the right to profess one's faith publicly and prohibitions against faith-based discrimination. However, starting with the passage of a comprehensive religion law in that outlined registration requirements, government leaders have shown a willingness to repress religious practice in.Martyred in the USSR is a documentary about militant atheism in the former Soviet Union.

It tells the personal, emotional and horrific story of what people went through simply because they chose to cling to their faith, even at the risk of death.

It did not matter what religion you practiced, if you believed in God in the USSR you were persecuted, and persecuted brutally.The Modern Encyclopedia of Religions in Russia and the Soviet Union, Volume 3 Academic International reference series The Modern Encyclopedia of Religions in Russia and the Soviet Union, Paul D.

Steeves, ISBNEditor: Paul D. Steeves: Publisher: Academic International Press, Original from: the University of.